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Alternative Care per 1,000

Indicator #4 in the 2009-10 CMSL. Alternative care refers to the placement of children outside of their home after a determination of child abuse or neglect or to prevent possible abuse/neglect. Alternative care includes foster care (non-relative, kinship, and therapeutic homes), adoptive homes, group homes, residential treatment facilities, hospitals, independent care, and other types of care. CMSL Calculation: (Number of children in care x 1,000/Total estimated 2008 population under age 18). Data Source: Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (as of February 2009); Missouri Department of Social Services (as of December 2008)

Births that are Premature

Indicator #15 in the 2009-10 CMSL. Premature birth occurs prior to the completion of 37 weeks of pregnancy. CMSL Calculation: (Number of premature births/Total number of births) x 100. Data Source: Illinois Department of Public Health, Center for Health Statistics (2006); Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Missouri Information for Community Assessment (2007)

Child Abuse & Neglect (CA/N)

See the Child Welfare Information Gateway for definitions and descriptions of child abuse and neglect.

Child Abuse/Neglect Rate per 1,000 (Illinois)

Indicator #6B in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic is meant to capture the number of children who were victim to abuse or neglect (as defined by an indicated investigation) for every 1,000 children in the total population. This calculation is used for Illinois figures only; see Indicator 6A for Missouri geographies. Child abuse includes physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, and child neglect. CMSL Calculation: (Number of indicated child abuse or neglect victims x 1,000/Total estimated 2008 population under age 18). Data Source: Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (2008)

Child Abuse/Neglect Reports that Required Follow-up Services (Missouri)

Indicator #5A in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic is meant to capture the percentage of reports, out of all reports received, that verified the occurrence of child abuse and neglect, for Missouri. (See Indicator 5B for Illinois). Child abuse includes physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, and child neglect. In Missouri, child abuse and neglect hotline calls receive either an investigation or a family assessment. The Missouri Children’s Division requires follow-up services for those families whose cases have gone through: 1) an investigation with substantiation, 2) an investigation with no substantiation, but recommended preventive services, or 3) a family assessment with recommended preventive services. CMSL Calculation: (Number of child abuse or neglect reports that required follow-up services [investigation: substantiated, unsubstantiated with preventive services needed and family assessment services needed] /Total reports of alleged child abuse or neglect). Data Source: Missouri Department of Social Services (2008)

Child Care Capacity

Indicator #12 in the 2009-10 CMSL. This indicator provides only a point-in-time look at the number of licensed provider slots available in each ZIP code. The number of licensed child care slots can change dramatically over time. In the State of Missouri, a home-based child care provider is required to be licensed only if they have more than four children (who are unrelated to the provider) during hours of operation. Unlicensed child care providers are not required to report data or meet any formal accountability standards, and therefore the number of unlicensed child care slots is largely unknown. Data Source: Children’s Home + Aid (as of March 2009); Child Day Care Association (as of Aug. 2009)

Children at Risk of Abuse/Neglect Rate per 1,000 (Missouri)

Indicator #6A in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic is meant to capture the number of children who were victim to abuse or neglect for every 1,000 children in the total population. This calculation is used for Missouri figures only; see Indicator 6B for Illinois geographies. Child abuse includes physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, and child neglect. CMSL Calculation: (Number of children at risk of abuse or neglect x 1,000/Total estimated 2008 population under age 18). Data Source: Missouri Department of Social Services (2008)

Children of Metropolitan St. Louis

The Children of Metropolitan St. Louis Report, or CMSL, is the primary research publication of Vision for Children at risk. The printed book of about 150 pages includes ZIP Code and county-level data and maps on over 30 indicators of child well-being, for the 5 central counties of the St. Louis Metropolitan area: St. Charles County, St. Louis County, St. Louis City, Madison County, IL, and St. Clair County, IL. Data is generally published every two years; VCR has produced the printed document for almost 20 years.

County

One of the geographical boundaries in the Children of Metropolitan St. Louis Report. This report tracks data on the 5 central most counties of the 16-County Metropolitan Statistical Area that makes up St. Louis. The five counties are: St. Charles (MO), St. Louis County (MO), St. Louis City (MO), Madison (IL), and St. Clair (IL). County boundaries do not correspond to local ZIP Code boundaries; a single ZIP Codes can, and often does, transverse 2 or more counties. For this reason, county-level data in the CMSL report is not the always the mathematical sum of values for the ZIP Codes within it.

Crime Rate

Indicator #27 in the 2009-10 CMSL. CMSL Calculations: Missouri and St. Louis City: (Total no. of crimes x 1,000/Total 2008 population). Illinois: (Total no. of crimes x 1,000/Total 2007 population). Missouri crimes include: criminal homicide, negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, attempted rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. Illinois crimes include: murder, criminal sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, theft, motor vehicle theft, and arson. St. Louis City crimes include: murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, auto theft, and arson. Data Source: Illinois State Police (2007), Missouri Uniform Crime Reporting Program (2008), St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department (2008)

Disabled Students

Indicator #22 in the 2009-10 CMSL. Both Missouri and Illinois define the following as a disability: mental retardation, orthopedic impairment, specific learning disability, visual impairment, hearing impairment, deaf-blindness, speech or language impairment, emotional disturbance, other health impairment, multiple disabilities, developmental delay, autism, and traumatic brain injury. Data Source: Illinois State Board of Education (SY 2007-2008); Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (SY 2007-2008)

Dropout Rate

Indicator #25 in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic is meant to capture the number of students who drop out of school enrollment (after accounting for school transfers) compared the fall enrollment numbers. This percentage is not the “remainder” of the 4-Year Graduation Rate (CMSL Indicator #18) which tracks the percentage of students who graduation over a four-year period. Missouri formally defines the dropout rate as the number of dropouts divided by the fall enrollment plus transfers in, minus transfers out plus total fall enrollment divided by 2. Illinois defines the dropout rate as the number of dropouts divided by the fall enrollment minus post graduates multiplied by 100. Data Source: Illinois State Board of Education (SY 2007-2008); Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (SY 2007-2008)

Early Childhood Development

One of the six “Fundamental Needs Areas” for the health and well-being of children and families targeted by the St. Louis Children’s Agenda, a coalition of local agencies. Early Childhood Development refers to areas involving children birth through age 6 or 7, including child care quality and availability, school readiness, and developmental delays.

Expenditure per Pupil

Indicator #20 in the 2009-10 CMSL. The average expenditure per pupil in Missouri is based on the average daily attendance in the regular school year and summer school for grades kindergarten through 12. It does not include capital and debt services expenditures. Illinois defines the average expenditure per pupil as “operational expenditure.” This definition includes gross operating costs of a district excluding summer school, adult education, bond principal retired and capital expenditures. Data Source: Illinois State Board of Education (SY 2007-2008); Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (SY 2007-2008)

Family Support

One of the six “Fundamental Needs Areas” for the health and well-being of children and families targeted by the St. Louis Children’s Agenda, a coalition of local agencies. Family Support refers to areas involving monetary and supportive services to families, child abuse and neglect prevention, foster care and adoption, family strengthening programs, and other similar topics.

Federal Poverty Level

Indicator #7 in the 2009-10 CMSL. The poverty threshold is updated each year by the U.S. Census Bureau. The monetary amount varies according to family size and composition. In 2008, the poverty threshold for a family of three with two children was $17,346. CMSL Calculation: (Total number of families with children under age 18 living below the Federal Poverty Level/Total 2008 estimated number of families with children under age 18) x 100. Data Source: Claritas, Inc. (2008)

Free or Reduced Lunch

Indicator #21 in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic is meant to show the proportion of students whose family income lies below certain measure of poverty. The figure is not a measure of how many students actually participate in the free and reduced-priced lunch program. Students in both Missouri and Illinois are eligible for a free lunch if they live below 130% of poverty, and a reduced lunch if they are between 131% and 185% of the federal poverty level. Data Source: Illinois State Board of Education (SY 2007-2008); Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (SY 2007-2008)

Graduation Rate

Indicator #18 in the 2009-10 CMSL. The four-year graduation rate tracks students in one high school class over a four-year period and reflects the number of students who graduate on schedule after starting high school. This percentage is not the “remainder” of the Dropout Rate (CMSL Indicator #25) which accounts for the percentage of students who drop out within a single school year. Missouri defines the high school graduation rate as the number of graduates divided by grades 9-12 cohort dropouts plus graduates multiplied by 100. Illinois defines the graduation rate as the number of 2007 – 2008 graduates divided by the 9th grade enrollment in 2000 minus transfers out plus transfers in multiplied by 100. Data Source: Illinois State Board of Education (SY 2007-2008); Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (SY 2007-2008)

Households Headed by Single Mothers

Indicator #9 in the 2009-10 CMSL. CMSL Calculation: (Number of households headed by single mothers/Total number of households) x 100. Data Source: Claritas, Inc. (2008)

Indicated Child Abuse/Neglect Reports (Illinois)

Indicator #5B in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic is meant to capture the percentage of reports, out of all reports received, that verified the occurrence of child abuse and neglect, for Illinois. (See Indicator 5A for Missouri). Child abuse includes physical, sexual, and emotional abuse, and child neglect. Illinois child abuse and neglect hotline calls are determined to be either “indicated,” where there is sufficient evidence of abuse or neglect, or “not-indicated.” CMSL Calculation: (Number of indicated child abuse or neglect reports/Total reports of alleged child abuse or neglect) x 100. Data Source: Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (2008)

Infant Mortality Rate

Indicator #16 in the 2009-10 CMSL. The infant mortality rate (IMR) reflects the number of children per 1,000 live births who die before their first birthday. CMSL Calculation: (Number of infant deaths x 1,000/Total number of births). Data Source: Illinois Department of Public Health, Center for Health Statistics (2001-2005); Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Missouri Information for Community Assessment (2002-2007)

Key Indicator

Key Indicator refers to one of the 31 indicators tracked in the Children of Metropolitan St. Louis Report. The key indicators collected are direct or proxy measure of the well-being of local St. Louis children and families. For a list of the indicators, please see this link (add link here).

Lead Poisoning

Indicator #17 in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic is meant to capture the percentage of children who are tested as poisoned out of all children who are tested. Even in targeted areas where environmental lead hazard is frequently prevalent, not more than 50% of the total child population is usually tested per year, a figure which local public health professionals have consistently tried to increase. Nationally, children are considered lead poisoned if their blood lead levels are greater than 10 micrograms per deciliter. It is important to note, however, that any amount of lead can result in deleterious effects. There has been a movement to redefine lead poisoning as 5 micrograms/deciliter, though this change has not yet been made locally or nationally. CMSL Calculation: (Number of children under age six with blood lead levels over 10 micrograms per deciliter/Number of children tested for lead poisoning) X 100. Data Source: Illinois Department of Public Health, Division of Environmental Health (2007); Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Office of Surveillance (2008)

Limited English Proficiency (LEP)

Indicator #23 in the 2009-10 CMSL. Although LEP may be defined slightly differently by state, it generally refers to K-12 students who come from an environment in which the dominant or native language is a language other than English, and for whom English as the language of instruction within the classroom is a barrier to student achievement. CMSL Calculation: (Number of students in school district with LEP/Total district population) x 100. Data Source: Illinois State Board of Education (SY 2007-2008); Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (SY 2007-2008)

Low Birth Weight

Indicator #13 in the 2009-10 CMSL. Low birth weight is defined as a birth weight of less than 5 lb 8 oz (2,500 grams). CMSL Calculation: (Total number of births with low birth weight/Total number of births) x 100. Data Source: Illinois Department of Public Health, Center for Health Statistics (2006); Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Missouri Information for Community Assessment (2007)

Market Rate of Child Care

Indicator #11 in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic captures a point-in-time weekly monetary value for child care costs (for all pre-school ages) in a particular geography. Costs is often, but not always, an indicator of quality, as certain additional costs such as curriculum planning, accreditation compliance, and professional development also increase the quality of the child care provided. CMSL Calculation: MO: [avg. weekly cost (0-24 mos.) + avg. weekly cost (25 mo. - 5 years)] / 2. Data Source: Children’s Home + Aid (as of March 2009); Child Day Care Association (as of Aug. 2009)

Maternal & Child Health

One of the six “Fundamental Needs Areas” for the health and well-being of children and families targeted by the St. Louis Children’s Agenda, a coalition of local agencies. Maternal & Child Health refers to areas involving a mother’s health during and after pregnancy, environmental health and safety, and specific child health topics.

Median Household Income

Indicator #8 in the 2009-10 CMSL. The median income represents the midpoint of all incomes within the ZIP code, with half of the figures lying above the median and half lying below. Data Source: Claritas, Inc. (2008)

Medicaid/SCHIP

Indicator #3 in the 2009-10 CMSL. Medicaid/SCHIP is a federal assistance program that assists low income persons with the affordable health care. CMSL Calculation: (Number of Medicaid (or SCHIP) recipients under age 18/Total estimated 2008 population under age 18) x 100. Data Source: Missouri Department of Social Services (as of December 31, 2008)

Mobility Rate

Indicator #24 in the 2009-10 CMSL. The mobility rate is defined as the sum of students who transferred into and out of schools divided by fall enrollment multiplied by 100. While the State of Illinois tracks the K-12 mobility rate, the State of Missouri only tracks the mobility rate for 9th- 12th graders. Data Source: Illinois State Board of Education (SY 2007-2008); Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (SY 2007-2008)

No or Inadequate Prenatal Care

Indicator #14 in the 2009-10 CMSL. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services defines inadequate prenatal care as: less than 5 visits for pregnancies lasting less than 37 weeks, less than 8 visits for pregnancies of 37 weeks or longer or care beginning after the fourth month of pregnancy. The Illinois Center for Health Statistics defines inadequate prenatal care as care beginning in the third trimester of pregnancy. CMSL Calculation: (Number of births with no or inadequate prenatal care/Total number of births) x 100. Data Source: Illinois Department of Public Health, Center for Health Statistics (2006); Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Missouri Information for Community Assessment (2007)

Population & Demographics

This category refers to a section of the Children of Metropolitan St. Louis report containing three indicators: Population Under Age 18, Population Under Age 5, and Minority Population. The CMSL publication contains other indicators that can be considered demographic information, such as Median Household Income, and Poverty, but these indicators are listed separately under the Family Support area.

Population Classified as Minority

Indicator under “population and demographics” in the 2009-10 CMSL. This is a statistics derived from census estimates to capture the non-white population, including those of Hispanic origin. CMSL Calculation: ([Total estimated 2009 population - Total estimated White/Non-Hispanic 2009 population]/Total estimated 2009 population) x 100. Data Source: Claritas, Inc. (January 1, 2009)

Population Under Age 18

Indicator under “population and demographics” in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic represents the total population represented by the 18-year span from birth (age 0) through age 17. CMSL Calculation: (Total estimated 2009 population under age 18/Total estimated 2009 population) x 100. Data Source: Claritas, Inc. (January 1, 2009)

Population Under Age 5

Indicator under “population and demographics” in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic represents the total population represented by the 5-year span from birth (age 0) through age 4. CMSL Calculation: (Total estimated 2009 population under age 5/Total estimated 2009 population) x 100. Data Source: Claritas, Inc. (January 1, 2009)

Quality Education

One of the six “Fundamental Needs Areas” for the health and well-being of children and families targeted by the St. Louis Children’s Agenda, a coalition of local agencies. Quality Education refers to areas involving classroom education, teaching, school governance and financing and other specific topics.

Safe Neighborhoods & Strong Communities

One of the six “Fundamental Needs Areas” for the health and well-being of children and families targeted by the St. Louis Children’s Agenda, a coalition of local agencies. Safe Neighborhoods & Strong Communities refers to areas involving law enforcement and the juvenile legal system, crime, neighborhood stabilization and other specific topics.

School District

The Children of Metropolitan St. Louis Report uses school district-level data for eight education-related indicators. The St. Louis Public School (SLPS) District corresponds to the geographical boundaries of the county of St. Louis City, but other school districts are only a portion of a county, or may overlap one or more counties. School districts are sometimes, analogous to municipality or neighborhood boundaries, and sometimes a combination of several neighborhoods/municipalities.

Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Program

Indicator #2 in the 2009-10 CMSL. SNAP is a federal assistance program that assists low income persons with the purchase of food. CMSL Calculation: (Number of SNAP recipients under age 18/Total estimated 2008 population under age 18) x 100. Data Source: Illinois Department of Human Services (2008); Missouri Department of Social Services (as of December 2008)

Teacher Ratio

Indicator #19 in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic is meant to capture the number of students for every teacher within a school district; it is not necessarily analogous to class size. Missouri defines a teacher as an instructor. That definition includes special education, remedial reading, Title I, and vocational teachers. Illinois’ definition of a teacher includes classroom teachers and teachers specializing in fine arts. Data Source: Illinois State Board of Education (SY 2007-2008); Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (SY 2007-2008)

Teenage Mothers

Indicator #26 in the 2009-10 CMSL. This statistic captures the number of births to mothers who were under 20 years of age. In order to comply with HIPPA legislation, states may choose not to report the number of teen births, if the incidence is very low, to protect the privacy of individual patients. CMSL Calculation: (Number of births to teens under 20/Total number of births) x 100. Data Source: Illinois Department of Public Health, Center for Health Statistics (2006); Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Missouri Information for Community Assessment (2007)

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

Indicator #1 in the 2009-10 CMSL. TANF is a federal assistance program that provides cash assistance to indigent American families with dependent children. CMSL Calculation: (Number of TANF recipients under age 18/Total estimated 2008 population under age 18) x 100. Data Source: Illinois Department of Human Services (2008); Missouri Department of Social Services (as of December 31, 2008)

Trending

The trending line in the Info Center pulls the data values for each year the data has been collected and plots them to scale in a line. The line shows the general variation in data from one year to the next for the indicator and geography specified.

Unemployment Rate

Indicator #10 in the 2009-10 CMSL. Due to the dramatic fluctuations in the unemployment rate over the last two years, research consultant Russell Signorino and VCR’s research staff figured the Unemployment Rate differently, for the 2009-10 publication, than has been done in past editions of the CMSL. Previously, VCR used Claritas estimates of point-in-time data from January 1 of the reporting year. The 2009-10 unemployment data was calculated from U.S. Census Bureau population data, and employment data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (July, 2009, revised). The 2009 data was calculated using the Census Share Method to derive estimates of employment and unemployment data at the Zip code level. This method provides a more accurate and current portrait of unemployment in the St. Louis metropolitan area, but the methodology is not comparable to previous years’ methodology. In previous year’s editions of the CMSL, the Unemployment data was received from Claritas, Inc. and reported; no VCR calculation was made. The unemployment data captures only a point-in-time snapshot of the civilian labor force, age 16 and over, who did not have a job, had been looking for employment for the previous four weeks, and were available to start a job. Data Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (July, 2009, revised)

Violent Crime

Indicator #28 in the 2009-10 CMSL. CMSL Calculations: Missouri and St. Louis City: (Total no. of violent crimes x 1,000/Total 2008 population). Illinois: (Total no. of violent crimes x 1,000/Total 2007 population). Missouri violent crimes include: criminal homicide, negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, attempted rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Illinois violent crimes include: murder, criminal sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault. St. Louis City violent crimes include: murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Data Sources: Illinois State Police (2007), Missouri Uniform Crime Reporting Program (2008), St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department (2008)

Youth Development

One of the six “Fundamental Needs Areas” for the health and well-being of children and families targeted by the St. Louis Children’s Agenda, a coalition of local agencies. Youth Development refers to areas involving the transition from teenage years to adulthood, and covers topics including job readiness, high-school dropout and graduation rates, mentoring, after-school and out-of-school time activities.